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Monday, October 2, 2017

October Book Report Projects

Project Expectations

Book Report Rubric
Category
25
20
15
10
Instructions
It’s clear that the student understood the task well, for all of the project’s instructions were followed flawlessly.
The student understood the task, for most of the project’s instructions were followed, but one or two requirements were left out.
It’s unclear whether or not the student understood the task because several required items were left out of the project.
Either the student didn’t understand the task or the student didn’t take the time to follow the project’s instructions.
Effort
The student undoubtedly devoted a lot of time and effort into the project because it’s neat, detailed, and something to be proud of.
The student devoted some time and effort into the project because it’s neat and fairly detailed, but there is some room for improvement.
The student devoted a little time and effort into the project, but it could be neater, and more details could’ve improved the project’s quality.
It’s clear that the student didn’t devote enough time and effort into the project because it’s not very professional and lacks quality. There’s a big need for improvement.
Originality
The project contains many creative, interesting, and important details. Clearly the student thought the project through carefully.
The project contains several creative, interesting, and important details. The student thought about the project before starting.
The project contains a few creative, interesting, and important details, but parts are vague or confusing.
The project contains little evidence of creative, interesting, or important details. The student could’ve put more thought into the project.

Project Options - 8th

A-Day – Monday, October 16    —    B-Day – Tuesday, October 17
Option
Details
Character Interview
Interview a character from your book. Create at least 10 thoughtful questions to ask the character and (pretend) answer them with clear, thorough responses. The questions should give the character the opportunity to discuss his/her thoughts and feelings about events and characters in the story. You may role-play this with a friend in front of the class or type it out magazine style.
Make a Timeline
Create a timeline of all the main events in the book. Include a minimum of 15 events written in complete sentences. Create a slides presentation, list the events, or design a poster. Either keep a paper bookmark with room enough to jot down the main events of each chapter as you read, or use sticky notes to mark those events at the end of each chapter to help avoid plagiarism.
Give a Sales Talk
Present your book to the class by pretending to be a bookseller. Bring a copy of the novel on the day of your presentation, along with one other visual aid (slideshow, meme, video, poster, costume, audio clip of a passage, business card, etc.). The sales talk should engage the audience and encourage them to buy/read the book. It must be at least two minutes long but no longer than five minutes. Sign up with Mrs. Means.
Draw Five Sketches
Reflect on some of the most captivating moments from the book you read and select five scenes to represent in drawings. The five different sketches can be done in pencil, but they must be detailed and represent key features of each scene you choose. Drawing with colored pencils or finely tipped markers are also options. Each sketch must include a paragraph-long caption that provides an explanation of the picture.
Journal Entries
Create a journal that one of the story’s main characters might have kept before, during, or after the book’s events. You’ll need to include information on the events the character is going through, but remember that journals record one’s thoughts and feelings in detail. Include at least five entries made up of 6+ sentences each.
Honors Addition
CHARACTER YEARBOOK:
Create a yearbook that includes pictures and brief facts about each character from the book, as well as a quote that captures the character’s personality. This project would be great for a novel with many characters (i.e. To Kill a Mockingbird, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone) because you’ll need to include at least 10. The yearbook can look like an actual yearbook or be presented in a poster or with Slides.

Project Options - 7th

Book Report #1: Due Monday, October 16
Option
Details

Character Interview
Interview a character from your book. Create at least 10 thoughtful questions to ask the character and pretend-answer them with clear, thorough responses. The questions should give the character the opportunity to discuss his/her thoughts and feelings about events in the story. You may role-play this with a friend in front of the class or type it out magazine style.

Make a Timeline
Create a timeline of all the main events in the book. Include a minimum of 15 events written in complete sentences. Create a slides presentation, list the events, or design a poster. Either keep a paper bookmark with room enough to jot down the main events of each chapter as you read, or use sticky notes to mark those events at the end of each chapter.

Give a Sales Talk
Present your book to the class by pretending to be a bookseller. Bring a copy of the novel on the day of your presentation, along with one other visual aid (slideshow, meme, video, poster, costume, audio clip of a passage, business card, etc.). The sales talk should engage the audience and encourage them to buy or read the book. It must be at least two minutes long but no longer than five minutes.

Draw Five Sketches
Reflect on some of the most captivating moments from the book you read and select five scenes to represent in drawings. The five different sketches can be done in pencil, but they must be detailed and represent key features of each scene you choose. Drawing with colored pencils or finely tipped markers are also options. Each sketch must include a sentence-long caption that provides an explanation of the picture.

Thursday, September 21, 2017

On-Track in Language Arts

Article Project (8th)

The eighth graders have been learning about what it takes to write an article. They crafted questions, conducted interviews, organized ideas, and have been writing rough drafts for the Article Project. B-Day students need to have their articles typed and the self-checklist completed before class starts on Monday--and the same goes for A-Day students on Tuesday--in preparation for peer revision centers. As a side note, please remember to ask your students daily about what they're reading for their book projects! Due dates are posted below.

B-Day:
  • 9/25: Rough Draft + Self-Checklist
  • 9/27: Final Draft Article
  • 10/17: Book Report 1

A-Day:
  • 9/26: Rough Draft + Self-Checklist
  • 9/28: Final Draft Article
  • 10/16: Book Report 1

Reading Strategies (7th)

Seventh grade students are in the middle of a unit on reading strategies. We've learned to identify informational and literary text, and we've been improving our decoding skills when it comes to challenging words in a text. All students should be reading at home for homework. Please talk to your child about the book that's being read for language arts. Conversations about what we read don't just help keep us accountable; they also help with comprehension! 

7th:
  • 10/16: Book Report 1

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

SAGE Testing & Book Report 4

Testing and Reading

Testing for English/language arts has begun! Remember to eat breakfast daily, get a minimum of eight hours of sleep a night, and bring your book to class. Although there is no homework, on-going projects, such as Book Report 4, are taking place. Reading should be part of your weekly routine. If you have questions about the projects available, specific information is posted below.

A-Day: Friday, May 19  –  B-Day: Thursday, May 18
Option
Details
Setting Brochure
Create a tri-fold brochure that advertises the main setting of the novel as a destination location. Use details about the time and place of the story to construct the tri-fold with pictures, advertised facts (climate, language…), prices of hotels and transportation, popular tourist sites, etc. You might even include quotes from the book in reference to the setting. For example, what does Katniss think of the Capitol? What did Bruno say about living in “Out-With”?
News Report Video
If you are interested in having a couple of friends or family members help you with your project, the news report video is a fun choice. Using a recording device, create a video with the characteristics of the nightly news. You can either act as the reporter on location (in the middle of it), or you can choose to act as a news anchor in the studio. Provide information to the public about the conflicts in the story as if they were real events. To make it authentic, “suit up”, use a professional voice, attempt a little editing, and feel free to experiment with camera angles.
Book Poster A or B
Option A: Advertisement
   -Using poster board, create a professional advertisement for the book including the following: title, author, genre, drawing/painting of an important scene, at least two powerful quotes from the text, and a star rating, including your personal two-sentence review.
Option B: Collage
   -Using a poster board, create an artistic collage of important items and quotes from the book. A minimum of 10 (2-D or 3-D) items must be attached, and at least two quotes included in the mix. The poster must include one sentence for each item/quote that explains its significance to the book on either the back or the front.
Powtoon Animation
With the help of Powtoon, a free online animation tool, present your book. There are many options here: create an animation that “sells” the book to your peers, follow the basic book report template to analyze what you read, follow a storyboard to summarize the plot in your own words, use the tool to modify a previous project (character yearbook, timeline)… Simply sign in with your OPA Google account to get started.